What they should improve: Their blogging system is missing some key features like tags or a native commenting system. If you are looking to create an online store, look elsewhere – their solution is pretty basic. Unlike Wix or Weebly they don’t have an app store; these can be really convenient as they let you install extensions that enhance your site’s capabilities.


Thank you for writing this. I am about to start this endeavor. I have a couple questions that maybe you can help me with if you don't mind. First I am afraid of my idea getting out there and someone taking it. Is there a way to protect it? I have heard patents are not recommended for Web ideas. Also, my idea is an interactive one, not just a way to advertise etc. Not quite a game but maybe more so than just a web page. That's where my confusion really comes in. I am about to do exactly what you have recommended with the drag and drop but I am naively assuming it won't be something I can use with the public because of the interaction involved. I know I will need the program to watch out for many things and organize them as well. Any advice you can give me on that would be very appreciated.
Several of the services included here offer free options, too. If you choose that path, however, your site will include branding from the provider, which necessarily makes your site less impressive to savvy surfers—and shoppers. Free offerings vary greatly in the amount of storage and bandwidth they allow, so read the small print to find out how much you get with each provider. Weebly, Wix, and WordPress.com are among the most generous with their free offerings, if that's the way you want to go.

Getting your message out these days requires good helpings of Facebook and Twitter, with maybe a dash of Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Tumblr. But that's not enough: if you want an internet presence that truly represents you or your organization, you also need a website that sets you apart from the crowd. A real website, as opposed to a social media page, gives you complete control over design and content. This lends credibility to your business, organization, or personal brand. Facebook pages all look alike in terms of design, but on your own website, you can realize a brand image, offer products for sale, and integrate third-party web services.
"We cannot recommend Simbla online website builder enough! Building our index of best escape room games as quickly as we did would not have been possible without Simbla’s extensive database feature and dynamic data. Thanks to the flexibility of Simbla’s UI, we now have a well-designed website that only took minutes to create and increases its traffic by the day."
Cory Lebson has been a user experience consultant for over 20 years and for the past decade has been the Principal of Lebsontech LLC, a small, user research-oriented UX consultancy. He is also the author of The UX Careers Handbook (CRC Press, 2016), and a Lynda.com / LinkedIn Learning instructor for several courses about UX Careers. Cory also speaks frequently on topics related to UX career development, user experience, user research, information architecture, and accessibility.

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The basic plan is free, but is extremely limited. Their personal plan starts with $4 per month billed annually and includes a custom domain. Premium plan costs $8.25 per month billed annually and it gives you the ability to monetize your site and advanced design customization. Business plan costs $24.92 per month billed annually, and it gives you the ability to have Ecommerce and custom plugins.
Blogs are swell, but sometimes you need a simple place to park your persona on the internet for branding purposes. In this case, you can just get a nameplate site, or as we prefer to think of them, a personal webpage (rather than a multipage site). Instead of linking internally to your store or other pages of note as you would with a more traditional web page, a personal site usually has links that go elsewhere—to your social networks, wish lists, playlists, or whatever else is linkable.

Jen specializes in efficient applications of research methods to ensure scientific rigor is not compromised while working fast to gain actionable results. She is the co-author of Usability Testing for Survey Research (2017) and co-author/editor of Eye Tracking in User Experience Design (2014). She has held UX positions in both industry (Facebook, Instagram, Fors Marsh Group) and government (US Census Bureau), and has worked as an independent consultant as well.

Spark is pretty much the anti-Dreamweaver in that it’s as easy as it gets. But that has mainly to do with their limited feature set. Rather than building websites, it allows you to create a single web page. There’s no blog, store or any other business features. It does offer nice design possibilities and lets you create really nice galleries. But be aware – Adobe puts its brand top and bottom. To get rid of their ads you’ll have to pay around $10 monthly. Frankly, for this kind of money you are much better off with site builders like Wix or Ucraft.


What about Webydo? I’ve seen other blogs that recommend them as cloud based website software, but it doesn’t even seem to make your list. Could you at least write a review to help us understand why it isn’t included in this list. I’ve heard very good things about it. It is a bit expensive, but I’m sure that you can justify/disprove that price very easily.

Hey Ben, thank you for all the information. I think web site builders in general are a great tool for novice computer users such as myself. I started my own website and it took me only a few hours to do so! I know I might sound childish, but this is unheard of for me. I used the Wix website builder software which was free of charge, and I am contemplating upgrading to the 2nd plan in order to remove the banner ads.
Starting a website that I prefer would be hosted with security features… a combination blog/website with “tab” for online store for a few items (or that would link to an Etsy store) accepting payments by Paypal, Visa/Mastercard. Also a “tab/dropdown” for ability to select videos that I will be posting on you-tube. I don’t want to do any coding, so drag and drop to a template plus ability to add in my own photos and SSL certificate are primary concerns. Is this all possible with wordpress choices?
It’s important to know what you want your website to do. Is it going to serve as informational only with contact information for your brick-and-mortar business? If so, you might want to consider reading through landing page reviews. If you plan to include a blog and photo slideshows to offer your customers free content, then you’ll want a website builder with a multitude of plug-ins for you to add. An ecommerce website can help you pull in revenue from an added avenue and, in that case, you’ll want to choose a website builder that’s meant for ecommerce businesses.
What about Webydo? I’ve seen other blogs that recommend them as cloud based website software, but it doesn’t even seem to make your list. Could you at least write a review to help us understand why it isn’t included in this list. I’ve heard very good things about it. It is a bit expensive, but I’m sure that you can justify/disprove that price very easily.
I’m pretty new to the whole web development/design aspect of things. I’ve tinkered before with free things but more specifically with forum design. I’m very interested in building a website but aside from having a main traditional website feel I’m looking to incorporate a forum to it. Would it be possible to do this with this WordPress/BlueHost tutorial here? Or would there be something you recommend for that sort of thing?
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Senior Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web... See Full Bio
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